Finding Practitioners like John Davis Rolfing

February 12, 2010

The John Davis Rolfing practice is a marriage of structural integration and chiropractics. Rolfing works on the soft tissues to stretch the non-cellular matrix that makes up the connective tissue called fascia. Fascia covers every muscle, bone and structure in the body. Rolfing breaks down the stiff fibers and allows them to stretch so that the body can come into balance with its center of gravity. Chiropractors work on the musculoskeletal system to help the body become balanced also. A combination of the two forms of manipulation, such as John Davis Rolfing and chiropractics, allows for complete alternative health care.

Many doctors and chiropractors include Rolfing in their practice because of the benefits for the client. Rolfing, as well as chiropractics is an alternative form of health care. Both Rolfers and chiropractors manipulate the body to create proper alignment. People report that John Davis Rolfing is painful at first touch; however the pain was replaced by a huge amount of energy.

The demand for Rolfers in the field of chiropractics has increased so much that insurance companies are coming on board to acknowledge the practice of Rolfing as an accepted mode of health care. Many practitioners, such as John Davis Rolfing, accept insurance such as Kaiser Permanente. Ask your insurance company if it covers Rolf treatments.

To find a Rolf practitioner in your area is easy; go to the Rolf Guild website and click on search for Rolfer. The directory will list the name and the contact information of the Rolfer. Once you have located one, just call or email them and ask about information about his/her practice. If you are interested in chiropractic therapy, such as with John Davis Rolfing, being included, just ask if he/she is also a chiropractor, or if there is a chiropractor on staff.

All Rolf practitioners operate on the fundamentals taught by the Rolfing founder, Ida P. Rolf. She taught that the body is like plastic, and it can change its shape. She taught that gravity changes the shape of the body due to the misalignment caused by the effects of gravity. Dr. Rolf taught that the connective tissue of the body could be manipulated to stretch to allow for the body to come into balance with its center of gravity. Dr. Rolf studied Yoga, osteopathy among other subjects to be able to help people. Her techniques are the same techniques used by all Rolf practitioners, including John Davis Rolfing.

Anyone looking for a Rolf professional that will meet your needs only needs to interview some professionals and ask questions. Ask how much the sessions cost, and if your insurance will cover it. Ask if it hurts to be Rolfed. Ask whatever questions that you feel you need an answer to. Then ask for testimonials from clients. Anecdotal evidence is often the deciding factor for many people. You can ask the practitioner’s clients the same questions you asked the Rolf professional. As with John Davis Rolfing can hurt, but most clients say it is a good kind of hurt. Most people admit to feeling much better and having much more energy than before they started Rolfing treatments.

The Ida Rolf Rolfing Technique

September 24, 2009

The Ida Rolf Rolfing Technique evolved over the span of many years. It is interesting how Dr. Rolf’s life work has continued on and evolved even after her death in 1978. Dr. Rolf graduated from Barnard College in 1916. After graduation she earned her Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Dr. Rolf developed some back problems after being kicked by a horse on a camping trip soon after graduating from college. She was not satisfied with the medical treatment she was getting, so she sought treatment from an osteopathic doctor instead. What she learned from the osteopath would lead her on to make her own discoveries that would become the Ida Rolf Rolfing technique.

For 10 years Dr. Rolf studied Tantric Yoga and applied this knowledge to helping people with disabilities. She used the postures of Yoga in her practice, and as she learned new techniques she incorporated them into her practice which evolved into what she called Structural Integration, but later became known as the Ida Rolf Rolfing technique.

Over the course of 50 years she studied and taught that through structural integration the changes that gravity makes on the body could be corrected over time. The body would come into balance with the planet’s gravitational field. Dr. Rolf learned through her studies that gravity is a constant force that is either pulling structures down or holding them up. Gravity’s effect on the body is that the body shape changes just like the body was a piece of plastic that could be molded. The connective tissue that encases every muscle, bone, and organ of the body is affected by the force of gravity, but can also be restructured through the Ida Rolf Rolfing technique.

Dr. Rolf started teaching in California at the Esalen Institute at Big Sur. She taught that the body is changeable, and that the imbalance of poor posture can be replaced by the balance of good posture. She called her work body education, and later changed it to Structural Integration. Her work caught on so that Boulder, Colorado became the headquarters for her work and was called The Guild for Structural Integration.

As the Ida Rolf Rolfing technique caught on in the 1960’s, the term Rolfing was coined and later became a registered trade service mark. Only Ida Rolf Rolfing technique certified practitioners are allowed to display the Rolfing service mark in their company logos. Licensed practitioners are now commonly known as Rolfers.

The Ida Rolf Rolfing technique evolved from the work of Dr. Rolf. She discovered that just as gravity can change a body from a state of balance to imbalance, her techniques could use gravity to assist the practitioner to put the body back into balance. She taught that the connective tissue could be stretched over time to reshape the body and promote not only balance with gravity, but also improvement in health.

Physical Therapy Rolfing Arizona

July 10, 2009

Anyone who is looking for the best physical therapy Rolfing Arizona has to offer needs to seek out skilled professionals. There are many ways to do this. You can go online and insert the words Rolf Practitioners in the search engine and the web addresses will show up for you to click on. You can also contact the Guild for the Rolf Institute and find every practitioner in your state.

Many people think of Rolfing as a type of massage, but it really isn’t. The effects of massage, even deep tissue massage lasts for only about 24 hours, but Rolf therapy is much longer lasting and is cumulative. The more treatments you get the more beneficial it is. Just as physical therapy works to bring the body back into balance to promote mobility and wellness, so does Rolfing. Physical therapy Rolfing Arizona works to bring the body into vertical alignment and in balance with the body’s center of gravity.

If you were to talk with someone about physical therapy Rolfing Arizona, he/she might tell you that the mind and the body live in harmony to one another. The body is controlled by the mind and that with Rolfing the mind and the body are educated to become stabilized and balanced. To find the perfect physical therapy Rolfing Arizona has to offer, find some practitioners in your area and send them an email or call them for an interview. Just like you might interview a new doctor who will be a guide in your health care, you would also want to talk to the practitioner that is going to be restructuring your body through the use of his/her hands.

To find the best physical therapy Rolfing Arizona practitioner, you might want to ask some questions. You might ask how Rolfing techniques vary from deep tissue massage. If you are not familiar with Rolfing, you might ask about the Rolf philosophy. You might ask a little about the history of Rolfing. Finding the best physical therapy Rolfing Arizona practitioner for you will have to be decided by you, so making an informed choice of professional is vitally important.

Manipulation of the body’s connective tissue can be a bit painful, so if you are someone who is very sensitive to pain you may need a practitioner that has a lighter touch. Finding the best physical therapy Rolfing Arizona professional is a matter of talking to people. You can ask a practitioner if you could talk to some of his/her clients. This is anecdotal evidence, but is there anything better than talking to a client to see if he/she is being helped by the Rolf therapy? Word of mouth is the best advertisement. This is a very good way of finding the best physical therapy Rolfing Arizona has to offer.

How Rolfing Massage Works

June 23, 2009

Rolfing massage is a technique devised by Dr. Ida Rolf, in the 1950s. Her technique has evolved over the years to improve the structure and function of the connective tissue of the body. This procedure manipulates the connective tissue that connects muscles to the skeletal attachments. Rolfing massage is implemented to create balance everywhere in the body in relation to their center of gravity.

Our society has become more sedentary in our everyday lives. Many people work behind desks and their only exercise is what they get while typing on a keyboard or getting up for coffee and TV breaks. Over time the connective tissue (fascia) thickens and becomes less functional. Fascia is thick fibrous plates of connective tissue that protect and envelope muscles and joins them to connect with cartilage and bone. The thicker the plates become the less elastic they become. Over time posture is affected. Rolfing massage breaks down the thick fascia allowing for better posture and better range of motion of body parts.

Rolfing massage therapy is preformed over a series of visits lasting an hour to an hour and 15 minutes each time. The goal is to realign and restructure the connective tissue, thereby realigning the body in relation to its center of gravity. With each Rolfing massage the client is asked to perform certain exercises such as walking, bending the knees, flexing and extending joints before and after the treatment. The level of movement and function is noted before and after treatment each time.

With poor posture the body can come out of alignment. Consider this scenario: The curvature of the neck could be off just enough to cause the head to come out of alignment with the spinal column, which could result in severe headaches and neck and shoulder pain. Rolfing massage works to break down those tight bands of connective fascia that constrict and contract the muscles and their skeletal attachments. Over time there will be noticeable improvement.

Poor posture and poor alignment is learned over time. Our muscle fibers react to an injury and we might favor that injured part of the body. We might favor the injury long after the injury has healed because the fibers retain a long memory of the injury. Hence a permanent change in how we maintain our posture may gradually take place. It is the cooperation between practitioner and client to work to change the structure of the connective fascia to regain a more functional body alignment in relation to his/her center of gravity.

The body and mind work together to make Rolfing massage effective. Through the course of the treatment and beyond you will be relearning how to maintain balance in the body. The gradual outcome should be that you are able to carry your weight evenly without favoring one side over the other. Rolfing massage is not only for the limbs, but for every area of the body.

What About Art Therapy Programs?

June 16, 2009

By the time the art therapy programs have been chosen in the Art Therapy school of choice, students should have already declared this their major primary field of study, which is considered the most important decision they will ever make. According to one college, the Ursuline College Graduate pre-requisites, many prerequisite courses will have been already completed in college to qualify for upper-level courses, with a Bachelor’s degree in art, psychology, behavioral science, social science, or a related field already acquired before art therapy programs can begin.

Schools that teach art therapy programs require the student to show evidence of their ability to do graduate work in the art therapy field. Not a simple field, this requires a 3.0 grade point average or above, which is based on a 4.0 system. The reason for this is because anything as a high school freshman (or 9th grade) and on up will be added to the cumulative GPA, which will effect the outcome of the schools seeking admittance to, and the scholarships being applied for. When applying to a school which teaches art therapy programs, this will have great impact on whether or not the student will be accepted.

Art therapy programs have quite a few prerequisites, which make art therapy classes easier to understand and to apply to one’s ability to learn. One such group of prerequisites to art therapy programs is a completed minimum of 18 semester hours in studio art–drawing, painting, clay or sculpture. Another is a minimum of 12 semester hours in Psychology, a prerequisite that involves four areas: General Psychology, Developmental Psychology, Personality or Counseling Development, and Abnormal Psychology or Psychopathology. And last but not least is some experience in a human service context field working with people on some level.

U.S. News has a partial list of 26 Art Therapy Schools which have quality art therapy programs under a national listing of the top “America’s Best Colleges 2008″ list. When choosing the college major for a future in art therapy, working with people of all types, ages, and backgrounds will be part of the job description. Working in art therapy uses visual artistic expression by the client to allow them to safely express hidden emotions and to explore their personal problems. The end result can enable them to achieve positive change in their lives, combined with personal growth. The major difference in art therapy, as compared to traditional psychological therapies, is that it consists of a three-way process. This process is combination of efforts between the client, therapist, and the artwork itself.

Art therapy programs have professionals to train the prospective art therapist to work in many different ways. Some of these ways are to work with other professionals as a team; assess the individual needs of the client; listen to them and provide guidance; work creatively with them in a therapeutic setting; enable the client themselves to explore their own creativity, their art work, and its process; and most important, maintain the latest research and new ideas regarding the latest developments of art therapy.

The Benefits of Rolfing

February 12, 2009

Rolfing is both similar and dissimilar to deep massage therapy; developed about 50 years ago by Ida P. Rolf. This treatment manipulates the deep connective tissues of the body. The practice of Rolfing provides longer lasting pain relief than massage therapy. The effects of massage therapy lasts for about 24 hours; however the effects of Rolfing lasts over time to improve posture and to put the body back into balance.

Similarities

The similarities of Rolfing to deep tissue massage are that the therapist puts his/her hands on you to manipulate the connective tissue beneath the skin. The therapist uses specific techniques to achieve this. Rolfing does not diagnose or treat disease, but many people who have been treated by a Rolf practitioner do report having pain relief. As with deep tissue massage, Rolfing can be very light and pleasurable, but it can also be a bit painful or even “hurt” in a good way. If the client feels uncomfortable from the pain, he/she just needs to speak up and let the practitioner know so less pressure can be applied.

Differences

A Rolf treatment is totally different than massage, even though it is sometimes thought of as a type of deep tissue massage. In massage oil or lotion is normally used, but in Rolfing no lubricant is used at all, unless absolutely necessary for tissue manipulation. A Rolf treatment is not like a massage, in that you don’t just lie back and get relaxed, many people do feel relaxed or full of energy, though, after treatment, but the goal is to help the body to realign to its center of gravity. Treatment over time should help you to hold your posture in its correct position in relation to gravity. Massage does not permanently change the connective tissue, where Rolfing usually does change the connective fascia to some degree.

Where massage therapist may not be interested in the function of your body parts, a Rolfer examine your posture, and ask you to walk and do some kinds of exercises to evaluate how your body moves. Massage sessions may last for 30 minutes, but these sessions may last up to 1 hour and 15 minutes.

Benefits

Rolf manipulation is a technique to realign the body parts to each other in gravity. This treatment is used to improve posture, to improve range of motion in body parts, which in turn also helps to relieve pain. The practitioner works on the connective fascia of the body, and as he/she manipulates this tissue, instructions may be given on how to become more aware of your posture and how you hold certain body parts in relation to the rest of your body.

Conclusion

Rolf manipulation is a continuing process. The connective tissue changes over time as you become more aware of how to position your body. The frequency of the treatments is normally in a series of 10. You can stop your treatment at any time; however, you may not quite feel as well if you stop taking the treatments. Over time you adjust to the changes in your connective fascia and feel at home in your new and improved posture. Most sessions end with specific exercises to improve posture and movement. The practitioner will have you do before and after exercises to compare the alignment and movement of the body before and after the treatment.

The Benefits of Rolfing

January 31, 2009

Rolfing is both similar and dissimilar to deep massage therapy; developed about 50 years ago by Ida P. Rolf. This treatment manipulates the deep connective tissues of the body. The practice of Rolfing provides longer lasting pain relief than massage therapy. The effects of massage therapy lasts for about 24 hours; however the effects of Rolfing lasts over time to improve posture and to put the body back into balance.

Similarities

The similarities of Rolfing to deep tissue massage are that the therapist puts his/her hands on you to manipulate the connective tissue beneath the skin. The therapist uses specific techniques to achieve this. Rolfing does not diagnose or treat disease, but many people who have been treated by a Rolf practitioner do report having pain relief. As with deep tissue massage, Rolfing can be very light and pleasurable, but it can also be a bit painful or even “hurt” in a good way. If the client feels uncomfortable from the pain, he/she just needs to speak up and let the practitioner know so less pressure can be applied.

Differences

A Rolf treatment is totally different than massage, even though it is sometimes thought of as a type of deep tissue massage. In massage oil or lotion is normally used, but in Rolfing no lubricant is used at all, unless absolutely necessary for tissue manipulation. A Rolf treatment is not like a massage, in that you don’t just lie back and get relaxed, many people do feel relaxed or full of energy, though, after treatment, but the goal is to help the body to realign to its center of gravity. Treatment over time should help you to hold your posture in its correct position in relation to gravity. Massage does not permanently change the connective tissue, where Rolfing usually does change the connective fascia to some degree.

Where massage therapist may not be interested in the function of your body parts, a Rolfer examine your posture, and ask you to walk and do some kinds of exercises to evaluate how your body moves. Massage sessions may last for 30 minutes, but these sessions may last up to 1 hour and 15 minutes.

Benefits

Rolf manipulation is a technique to realign the body parts to each other in gravity. This treatment is used to improve posture, to improve range of motion in body parts, which in turn also helps to relieve pain. The practitioner works on the connective fascia of the body, and as he/she manipulates this tissue, instructions may be given on how to become more aware of your posture and how you hold certain body parts in relation to the rest of your body.

Conclusion

Rolf manipulation is a continuing process. The connective tissue changes over time as you become more aware of how to position your body. The frequency of the treatments is normally in a series of 10. You can stop your treatment at any time; however, you may not quite feel as well if you stop taking the treatments. Over time you adjust to the changes in your connective fascia and feel at home in your new and improved posture. Most sessions end with specific exercises to improve posture and movement. The practitioner will have you do before and after exercises to compare the alignment and movement of the body before and after the treatment.

What is Rolfing

January 6, 2009

Not everyone is familiar with Rolfing. If you heard the term for the first time, you might ask, “What is Rolfing?” Rolfing has only been practiced since the 1950s. A biochemist by the name of Dr. Ida Rolf developed a technique of manipulating the connective tissue of the body’s framework. If 10 people were to ask one who has been Rolfed, what is Rolfing, each person may have a slightly different understanding from the person he/she asked.

Commonalities to what is Rolfing are that the practitioner works to align the head, shoulders, torso, pelvis and extremities so that each part is in sync or in balance with the rest of the body and its center of gravity. The body can get out of balance because one or more parts are affected by the shortening of the connective fascia that holds all the muscles and their skeletal attachments together. What is Rolfing? It softens and breaks down the fibers so that all the muscles of the body can work in harmony and balance.

Someone with one hip higher than the other may ask “What is Rolfing going to do for me?” Over time the hip that is contracted may be able to be in alignment with the other hip, therefore allowing for a normal gait, and less back and hip pain. When one part of the body is out of balance, it can cause pain and in some cases malformations of the musculoskeletal system over time.

What is Rolfing? It can be painful, but in a good sort of way. Rolfing shouldn’t be uncomfortably painful, although you might feel some discomfort. If you do feel any real discomfort, let your practitioner know. He/she may not notice your facial expression when you have an “ouch,” so be sure to voice your discomfort. Many people report that it “hurts so good,” or “it feels so good when it quits hurting.” What is Rolfing? It is both relaxing and invigorating depending on the recipient.

What is Rolfing? It is a fairly slow process. There are usually a series of 10 visits; one each week. The visits are fairly long, lasting up to 1 and ¼ hours each. Once the treatment has been given each week, the client needs to work on keeping those muscles and connective tissue elastic, rather than letting them become stiff again with disuse. Exercise techniques and stretching exercises such as Yoga can help keep the body in balance until the next visit.

The practitioner may take photographs of the client prior to the first treatment and then afterward. More pictures may be taken at the end of the 10 week period to document the improvement that has taken place. What is Rolfing? It isn’t mandatory that the client finish the 10 week cycle of treatments, although it is encouraged. The client can stop at any time, and resume at any time. If the client is not satisfied with the practitioner, he/she can stop the treatments and find another Rolf practitioner without being financially bound to the previous practitioner. It is like changing doctors; if you find you don’t care for one, you can find another.